Panel 1: A Shared Past: Public Outreach and Interaction

Location

Campus Center, Room 2540, University of Massachusetts Boston

Start Date

29-3-2014 9:00 AM

End Date

29-3-2014 10:30 AM

Description

“Doing” history can be interpreted in many different ways and this is due to the dynamic nature of history as a discipline. Doing history can be research, writing papers, working on a manuscript, putting final touches on a thesis, setting up a museum exhibit, being a tour guide, or teaching. In all these examples historians try to take their passion for the subject and make that clear to others. History needs an audience. Interest in history exists, if not, we would not have outlets like the History Channel. Dealing with an audience who wants to learn about history is one thing, but the ultimate in doing history is taking a group of young people who are forced to take history and teach them to like it (if not love it). Middle school and high school history teachers must wade through vast amounts of material in order to put together lessons that are accessible to young people. A good teacher must not only utilize a school text but must supplement it. School books are often outdated which can be challenging to a teacher. A teacher must also be aware of new scholarship and resources that are available. Not all students will appreciate our dedication to teaching history, but they will all benefit from our diligence in staying up-to-date on both historical and educational practices. This paper serves as a challenge to history teachers to use new scholarship, sources, and resources to bring the best education and historical knowledge to our students: the historians of the future.

Comments

PANEL 1 of the 2014 Graduate History Conference features presentations and papers under the topic of "A Shared Past: Public Outreach and Interaction."

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

 
Mar 29th, 9:00 AM Mar 29th, 10:30 AM

Historical Thinking: Perspectives on Teaching History in the Secondary Education Classroom

Campus Center, Room 2540, University of Massachusetts Boston

“Doing” history can be interpreted in many different ways and this is due to the dynamic nature of history as a discipline. Doing history can be research, writing papers, working on a manuscript, putting final touches on a thesis, setting up a museum exhibit, being a tour guide, or teaching. In all these examples historians try to take their passion for the subject and make that clear to others. History needs an audience. Interest in history exists, if not, we would not have outlets like the History Channel. Dealing with an audience who wants to learn about history is one thing, but the ultimate in doing history is taking a group of young people who are forced to take history and teach them to like it (if not love it). Middle school and high school history teachers must wade through vast amounts of material in order to put together lessons that are accessible to young people. A good teacher must not only utilize a school text but must supplement it. School books are often outdated which can be challenging to a teacher. A teacher must also be aware of new scholarship and resources that are available. Not all students will appreciate our dedication to teaching history, but they will all benefit from our diligence in staying up-to-date on both historical and educational practices. This paper serves as a challenge to history teachers to use new scholarship, sources, and resources to bring the best education and historical knowledge to our students: the historians of the future.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.